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Kim Jong Un Calls Trump a “Dotard”

Image via The New York Times

During a speech at the United Nations General Assembly, Donald Trump “shockingly” threatened to “totally destroy North Korea”, called Iran “a corrupt dictatorship”, and said Venezuela’s government “has inflicted terrible pain and suffering on the good people of that country.” The remarks haven’t failed to appear, Iran’s foreign minister calling Mr. Trump’s speech “ignorant hate speech [that] belongs in medieval times,” Venezuela’s foreign minister went on to say that “Trump is not the president of the world … he cannot even manage his own government.” While Donald Trump’s remarks aren’t totally off the mark as Iran has long been criticized by human rights groups and Venezuela’s dictatorship under Nicolas Maduro definitely doesn’t benefit its citizens, the language Mr. Trump used has been criticized by many U.S. allies. Swedish Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom told the BBC that “It was the wrong speech, at the wrong time, to the wrong audience,” Sarah Snyder, an associate professor who studies human rights at the American University’s School of International Service, was “struck by the extent to which the language he’s using is potentially more appropriate for schoolyard debates as opposed to what we normally see on the floor of the UN General Assembly,” “Using language like ‘loser terrorists’ [as Trump did to describe terrorist groups like ISIS] strikes me as not the most compelling way to make an argument about international policy.”, she said.

Kim Jong Un lashed out at Donald Trump too, following his threat to “totally destroy North Korea”. The supreme leader of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea called the U.S. President “dotard”, inspiring countless jokes on Twitter. Here are some of my favorite:

But what does “dotard” mean? While the term is not familiar among most English spearkers,  according to Merriam Webster, the word comes from the Middle English word “doten” (“to dote”), and initially meant ‘imbecile’.

Featured image via The New York Times.

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Sorana is a high school junior who hopes she can use her voice to move the world towards a better place. In her free time, she loves to read and listen to Broadway music.

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